Frequently Asked Questions for Prospective Customers - Plainsnet - High-Speed Broadband Internet for Hughes and Garvin Counties in Rural Oklahoma

Go to content

Main menu:

Frequently Asked Questions for Prospective Customers

Installation
Do you provide service to my area?
Do I need a telephone line to use Plainsnet high-speed internet?
Do I have to sign a contract?
What do you install at my house or office?

Usage Scenarios
Will Plainsnet high-speed internet work with my game console?
How well does Plainsnet internet handle online gaming?
Will Plainsnet internet stream Netflix?
Does Plainsnet limit internet use?


Other Questions

Is Plainsnet internet the same as satellite?
How do I know which package is right for me?
How does Plainsnet speed compare to DSL speed?
Why is Plainsnet more expensive than DSL (and cable) in terms of dollar-per-speed, aka "bang for buck"?


Do you provide service to my area?
Answer: We serve the rural communities of Atwood, Calvin, Cromwell, Holdenville, Horntown, Spaulding, Wewoka, Wetumka, and Yeager in the Hughes County area, and Byars, Joy, Paoli, Pauls Valley, Rosedale, and Wynnewood in the Garvin County area. For more detailed information, see our coverage chart.

Do I need a telephone line to use Plainsnet high-speed internet?
Answer: No.

Do I have to sign a contract?
Answer: There is a one year contract with a $200 early termination fee. However, we take each situation case-by-case. For example, it is not our policy to enforce the early termination fee if a customer moves, or if we are unable to provide him or her with a reliable internet connection.

What do you install at my house or office?
Answer: We mount either an antenna or a dish to an appropriate spot at your site. Usually these are mounted on the roof or eave, but sometimes to a tower, pole, or the side of a building. Often we will use a tower or a pole that is already on-site if the customer is agreeable. We also install a surge suppressor that is usually grounded. A single CAT5 ethernet cable is run from a module mounted at the antenna to the surge suppressor, then to the router or computer. We don't put a modem on the inside--only a small power adapter.

Will Plainsnet high-speed internet work with my game console?
Answer: Yes! Our customers include Xbox, Playstation, Wii, and computer gamers, as well as MagicJack and VPN users.

How well does Plainsnet internet handle online gaming?
Answer: If we can get you a solid signal, your gaming experience should be good as long is no other device is using your internet connection at the same time.

Will Plainsnet internet stream Netflix?
Answer: At our Silver plan and above it should play Netflix. If you are located in an area that will put you on one of our more congested APs, Netflix may not provide an optimal experience during peak times. However, all line-of-site customers should have a quality Netflix experience at any time of the day.

Does Plainsnet limit internet use?
Answer: The short answer is "no." We have implemented no bandwidth capping policy.

The caveat is that if we see high and unremitting bandwidth usage for an unreasonable amount of time, we may take appropriate action. 24/7 torrent usage, for example, is not encouraged. We will normally contact the customer first, however.

Is Plainsnet internet the same as satellite?
Answer: No. Satellite internet comes with limitations such as high latency and strict bandwidth caps.

How do I know which package is right for me?
Answer: Many factors affect this. Are you on a tight budget? The Bronze package was made for you. Do you often watch YouTube videos? Try our Silver package. Are you a gamer? Silver might work for you, but you might consider the Gold package. Do you find it hard to accept anything but the best? Platinum all the way! We are introducing a unique "speed" for Platinum called "open pipe." This basically means that we do not artificially limit your download speed. The idea for Platinum is for the speed to be "as fast as we can make you."

Still unsure? The good news is that it is easy to upgrade or downgrade if you choose the wrong package. We even offer one-week trials for current subscribers if you would like to try a another package before making your decision. This means that you can subscribe to our lowest package and try it for a while, then call us and ask for a one-week trial of a higher package to see whether it would be worth it to upgrade. Click here for more information.

How does Plainsnet speed compare to DSL speed?
Answer: A DSL provider normally has more than one package to choose from, so that would depend on which package you compare. There are two main differences between fixed-wireless (Plainsnet) and DSL: 1) the highest packages from DSL providers will sometimes be able to achieve higher speeds than Plainsnet is capable of, and 2) the speed of a Plainsnet connection is more affected by the number of internet users on at one time in your area than DSL is.

Why is Plainsnet more expensive than DSL (and cable) in terms of dollar-per-speed, aka "bang for buck"?
Answer: Except in the customer service department, Plainsnet generally does not try to compete with DSL in town. DSL providers are often large corporations such as AT&T, and their landline infrastructure is marketed to cities and towns where they are able to accumulate large amounts of customers. In addition, they may use some of the same infrastructure for other services, such as telephony. Our cost is affected by the price of maintaining our infrastructure, the initial cost of infrastructure, the initial cost of customer equipment, and the limited demographic (rural areas) that we market to.


DEFINITIONS

BIT - "Mbps" (megabits per second) and "kbps" (kilobits per second) are commonly referenced for internet speed. So what is a "bit?" Sometimes "bit" is confused with "byte." When downloading a file, for example, the speed might indicate "50 KB/s." That's slower than dial-up, right? Isn't dial-up 56k? Well, yes, dial-up is (up to) 56k, but the "k" in "56k" is "kbps." Notice the difference: KB/s vs. kbps. The first is "kiloBYTES per second." The second is "kiloBITS per second."

What's the difference? It takes eight "bits" to make a "byte"; therefore, if you want to know how fast that file is downloading in terms of how ISPs and speed test sites report connection speeds, multiply the "KB/s" by eight to get the "kbps." In our previous example, 50 KB/s becomes 400 kbps.

KB/s - Kilobytes per second. It takes about 1000 kilobytes (KB) to make 1 megabyte (MB).

kbps - Kilobits per second. It takes about 1000 bits to make 1 kilobit.

LATENCY - Usually a "ping test" is used to determine latency. A "ping" is the time it takes for a packet of information to get from a device, such as your computer, to a server and back. The higher the ping (or latency), the longer that packet takes to return. Online games such as first person shooters and racing games are very negatively affected by high latency, as they need constant feedback from all players (who shot whom, who moved where, etc.). Video conferencing and internet telephony are also negatively affected by high latency.

You might ask, "Isn't this the same as speed?" Not necessarily. Think of the difference between a cargo train and a cargo airplane. The train will take longer to get there than the plane, but once it gets there it will unload the cargo just as fast--provided the unloading crews are of equal quality. This is a slightly imperfect analogy when it comes to web-browsing, however, as sometimes a website will make several "handshakes" with your computer when you connect, and every one of those handshakes is like another train; therefore, a low-latency connection may generally "feel" snappier than a high-latency connection, even if the latter connects at a greater speed. Confused?  Just call us.

MB/s - Megabytes per second. It takes about 1000 megabytes (MB) to make 1 gigabyte (GB).

Mbps - Megabits per second. It take about 1000 kilobits to make 1 megabit.

 
Back to content | Back to main menu